Evil probably isn't a strong enough word to describe the horror that this former Quincy Valadictorian did in his life to end up on a list of the 10 Most Evil Doctors the World has ever seen.

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I have only lived in Quincy for 3 years, I moved here from Chicago, and if you're new or newish to Quincy like me then you have probably never heard of Michael Swango. I first heard his name a couple of weeks ago in a class that I am taking with the Quincy Police Department, and his name is trending once again for making a list titled The 10 Most Evil Doctors the World has ever seen.

The list was created by netluxury.com, and Michael Swango comes in at the 6th spot on the list, now I must say the following information about him is gruesome and contains sensitive material. On the site, they have him listed behind famous serial killers like H.H. Holmes, Thomas Cream, and Morris Bolber, they say about Michael Swango...

"He took up a position at Quincy University but soon found himself convicted of aggravated battery for poisoning co-workers. Swango was found to have injected arsenic into his co-worker’s food to make them sick...Swango pleaded guilty to three murders although the FBI believes he is responsible for more than 60. He is currently serving a life sentence."

Read the entire post about him on the list by clicking here!

I wanted to learn more about Michael Swango's ties to Quincy and if you got to his Wikipedia.org page they say that he was born in the state of Washington but was raised in Quincy and graduated as the valedictorian from Quincy Notre Dame in 1972, to read more about his time in Quincy click here! 

Obviously, this man is a dark part of Quincy's past and it is a good thing that he is rotting in jail serving a life sentence, it has been so long now since he was committing crimes and hurting people here in Quincy I wonder are you one of the people who remember Michael Swango?

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