Hank Williams Jr. took the stage at 2015 WE Fest wearing a black hat with the word "ICON" inscribed on the front. During his time onstage, he showed attendees that yes, he is truly an icon in country music.

The legend was accompanied by a 7-piece band and a slew of hats, around half a dozen. Williams' hat collection sat by the drum set, and throughout his set, he periodically changed hats. From a black fedora to tan cowboy hat and everything in between, his assemblage of head accessories was almost as impressive as his show.

Williams wove songs together impeccably; it was clear that he's been onstage for years and it comes as second nature. "Mind Your Own Business," a feisty piano solo on a baby grand and hit after hit meant a crowd that clapped throughout, danced and pumped their fists.

"The Blues Man" had fans crowding to the front and lifting up their phones for photos, while "Keep the Change" and a saxophone solo led into one of the best moments of the concert: "I Really Like Girls." Without stopping the pace, Williams tore through songs and showed off his guitar skills and fiddle talent. The first half of the set was primarily music, and he didn't stop to dialogue with the crowd until he ran through some older tunes, made famous by family friends.

"Ladies and gentlemen, I hope some of y'all have been to Nashville, Tenn. in the past four-and-a-half years. There's an exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame that ran for four-and-a-half years," he said, and he was speaking of Family Tradition: The Williams Family Legacy. "My childhood was not a normal childhood. I could barely touch my daddy's piano keys and everybody who's anybody was in my daddy's house."

From "There's a Tear in My Beer" to "All My Rowdy Friends (Have Settled Down)" to "I Walk the Line" (which he introduced by mentioning June Carter Cash was his godmother), Williams entertained in an acoustic set, then brought the energy back up with riveting guitar solos, capping off his WE Fest 2015 set it off with "Sweet Home Alabama" and "Family Tradition."

For the fadeout, Williams put his "ICON" hat back on, tossed his mic on the floor and the harmonica player serenaded him out.